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Climbing without an ACL

For my entire climbing life, I have climbed with an ACL injury.  The Anterior Cruciate Ligament is one of a pair of cruciate ligaments in the knee, forming a cross shape with the Posterior Cruciate Ligament. It provides crucial stability to the knee, preventing the knee from twisting and rotating.  You can find out more in this Youtube video about what the ACL is and what it does.

Background – how I tore my ACL

Emily Allen’s App recommendations

IMG_5581Emily Allen was the youngest female to climb 8a in the UK.  In July 2013 she climbed Aberration at Chee Dale.  If you’ve never heard of her you should read her story – she’s really inspiring, having had a number of setbacks yet still achieving the outstanding performance at the age of only 14 years old.  You can read more about Emily at Stoke Sentinal or on this superb UKC article.  A while back she shared her favourite three mobile apps with us, so we are sharing them with you now: 

Climbing to ease back pain

Stunning scenery – the dream landscape for fell runners

Climbing is very special. I find it is particularly good for easing back pain, especially upper back pain.  The golden rule of back pain for many syndromes is to move no matter what (never surrender). Backs can be really contorted and mishandled on climbing walls and generally they don’t seem to mind. Bad backs like it…they get better, well mine does.

In my mind I’m a fell runner, a long distance ultra marathon runner covering 50 miles a day, me effortlessly jogging along under blue sky and stars…

In truth, the body just isn’t having any of it.  It’s hard not to be a fell runner in Chinley, heart of the Peak District, mecca for runners and cyclists and all things outdoors, but in my world the ligaments are too loose to allow any strenuous activity without the joints going out of shape.

Rules of Life // by Michelle Mudhar

There are religious books, self help books, there is even Jeremy Kyle. Everyone seems to have a take on how to live life, and which rules to follow. Like many, I prefer to have a loose framework to live my life by. I don’t really have a particular ideology to follow.

two roads diverged in a wood and took the one less travelled by, and that has made all the difference.  Robert Frost.  This quote is with a picture of Michelle in a wood.

Michelle’s outlook on life through the lens of climbing

Climbing appeals to me as a sport because it too has a basic framework/set of rules to use. The laws of physics don’t change and I can solve problems using those laws to progress. The ironic part is that elements of climbing are all about breaking those rules. Taking that lead fall when you know its safe, but the rules say it’s dangerous: climbing past a clip because it’s easier to climb past it than clip in an awkward position; taking risks when you can just as easily walk away. Climbing has taught me so much about how to live my life.

Becoming a Munro Bagger: Part 1

The first in our series about becoming a munro bagger.   By Beth Thomas.

After reading an article in TGO magazine early last year I decided to become a Munro bagger. This is not as creepy as it sounds. A Munro is a mountain in Scotland of a height of at least 3,000ft and there are 282!

The article in question was on the Charlie Ramsey Round, a fell run challenge covering 24 Munros in under 24 hours! However I am not a superhuman and neither was the author of the article who wrote about walking it in 4 days. Even this looked like a challenge, a beautiful, tough wild camp challenge.  It was a good 12 months before this plan came to fruition when I convinced my dutiful and just as unassuming partner to do it with me.

Day 1- Expect the unexpected!

Buying a Waterproof Jacket


How to choose a Waterproof Jacket 61
I have recently taken the plunge and made the decision to replace my 12 year old jacket and enter the world of modern fabrics and design.  I thought I would jot down my experience and share it with you.

Firstly, it’s important to remember that staying dry is the key to staying warm.  I spent a lot of time researching different jackets and trying lots on before making a final choice.  This is definitely advisable if you are thinking of spending your hard earned cash, as a good waterproof jacket will set you back anything from £120 to £500 depending on what specification, fit, fabric, style, brand and colour you’re after.  Don’t feel under pressure to buy until you are happy with your choice.