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6.5. Actions & Practise

Exercise: Actions & Practise // Duration: Variable

Now you’re going to plan some action to boost your vicarious experiences. You have eight choices.  Choose one of the seven options listed below and take the action needed for the one you’ve chosen. Thinking back to the previous module about habits, you’ve got a ‘start small’ goal and a ‘thinking big’ goal.

1.  Join a Club:

Go along to a club of your choice and participate with others, giving yourself a chance to watch as others climb.  If you’ve never been to a climbing club or want to find a new one, you can look for women’s clubs on the Womenclimb Find a Club page or a climbing club on the BMC Find a Club page.

Start Small Goal: One session a month.

Think Big Goal: One session a week.

2.  Use Youtube:

Use Youtube to find videos that are around your grade and in your style of climbing. Here is some climbing inspiration to get you started: Climbing Inspiration 1920’s to 2017

Start Small Goal: Find one video that works for you and watch it once a week before climbing.

Think Big Goal: Research and find a new video each week on a Sunday afternoon and watch before each climbing session.

3.  Video Yourself:

Cameras on phones are now so good that there’s no excuse.  Go climbing and film your success.  Watch it back and write down 3 specific things you did well. Upload your video to Youtube and send us your link.  This will help us build a bank of success at every grade.

Start Small Goal: Video yourself once per month, re-watch afterwards and write down 3 things you did well.

Think Big Goal: Video yourself once during each session, re-watch afterwards and write down 3 things you did well.

4.  Video Others:  

The same as above – ask your friends and co-climbers if you can film them and their success, to help you understand how to climb better.  If they give their permission, upload it to Youtube and send us the link to add to our bank of success stories on film.

Start Small Goal: Video someone new once per month, re-watch afterwards and write down 3 things they did well.

Think Big Goal: Video someone else at each climbing session, re-watch afterwards and write down 3 things they did well.

5.  Ask someone to Demo their Skills:  

When you ask someone to repeat a move or help you, it’s surprising the positive results that you can gain.  Most people are happy to help and the more people who show you their method, the more likely you are to work out which goes best for you.

Start Small Goal: Once per month, when you go for a ‘second go’ at a boulder problem or route that you have been unable to complete, ask someone to demo it for you first.

Think Big Goal: Each time, when you go for a ‘second go’ at a boulder problem or route that you have been unable to complete, ask someone to demo it for you first.

6.  Watch People:

If you’re going to do this, do it actively.  Think ‘why am I watching’? ‘What do I want to learn?’

Start Small Goal: One session a month: Watch one person achieving a route that you found challenging. When you finish watching them, try the route yourself.

Think Big Goal: Every session watch at least one person achieving a route that you found challenging. When you finish watching them, try the route yourself.

7.  Start a group:

If you can’t find a group of people who you want to climb with, the chances are that there are other people out there feeling the same.  Maybe it’s time you started your own group.  It can be as formal or informal as you like – you’re in charge. Facebook, twitter, Womenclimb and the BMC all have resources and functionality to help you set your group up.  If you want a place to start, read our article about why setting up a group is a good idea or our article about how to set up a group.

Start Small Goal: Start a meet up with a group of 4 people once per month.

Think Big Goal: Create a BMC affiliated club with regular meets, a Facebook page and a website.

8. Watch or take part in a climbing Competition:

Watching or (even better) taking part in a climbing competition can help with vicarious experience.  Climbing competitions usually take place over a period of time, especially in the early rounds.  This means that you can watch others and then feel more confident through their success.  There are lots of friendly competitions around the UK, so ask at your local climbing centre.

Start Small Goal: Find a local climbing competition and watch the participants.

Think Big Goal: Enter a competition or series of competitions, where you can watch others at different levels trying the same problems or routes as you.

Outcome: Share what you’ve done, why and how you feel it went, in the comments box below.

When you’re ready, click next.